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Showing posts with label Diabetes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Diabetes. Show all posts

New Diabetes Drug May Help Shed Those Extra Kilos



A compound that mimics a naturally occurring hormone that regulates appetite may help obese people shed those extra kilos, according to a recent study. The compound, semaglutide, has a chemical structure that is very similar to the hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which regulates both insulin secretion and appetite. In December, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the semaglutide injection Ozempic as a once-weekly adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes.

"This randomized study of weight loss induced with semaglutide in people with obesity but without diabetes has shown the highest weight reductions yet seen for any pharmaceutical intervention," said lead author Patrick M. O'Neil of the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, S.C.



The new study included 957 participants, 35 percent of whom were male. All participants had a body mass index (BMI) of at least 30, but did not have diabetes. They were randomly assigned to seven different groups. Five groups received different doses of semaglutide (between 0.05 mg and 0.4 mg) via injection once daily; a sixth group received a placebo, and a seventh group received 3 mg of the diabetes drug liraglutide. All participants received monthly diet and exercise counseling.

After one year, all participants receiving semaglutide had lost significantly more weight than those receiving placebo. The higher the dose participants received, the greater their average weight loss. Participants who received 0.05 mg of semaglutide daily lost an average of 6.0 percent of their body weight; the 0.1 mg group lost an average of 8.6 percent; the 0.3 mg group lost an average of 11.2 percent; and those receiving a daily dose of 0.4 mg lost an average of 13.8 percent. Those receiving liraglutide lost an average of 7.8 percent of their body weight, while those in the placebo group lost only 2.3 percent on average.

Sixty five percent of participants who received 0.4 mg of semaglutide per day lost at least 10 percent of their body weight, compared with 10 percent of those in the placebo group and 34 percent of the liraglutide group.

The most common adverse events in those taking semaglutide were mild/moderate nausea, as seen previously with GLP-1 receptor agonists. O'Neil noted that further studies of semaglutide for obesity are underway. The research was presented at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago, Ill.

High-Fiber Generates Gut Bacteria Good for Type 2 Diabetes



A select "guild" of gut bacteria responsible for the benefits of high-fiber diets in type 2 diabetes has been identified in a study in which those patients on the high-fiber diet showed improved control of HbA1c.

Effectively, eating the right dietary fibers may rebalance the gut microbiome and lead to reduced blood sugar and body weight, and may pave the way for a new nutritional approach to preventing and managing type 2 diabetes, say the researchers.

The specific bacteria thought to be effective produce short chain fatty acids (SCFAs).

"Targeted promotion of the active SCFA producers...via personalized nutrition may present a novel ecological approach for manipulating the gut microbiota to manage type 2 diabetes and potentially other dysbiosis-related diseases," write the authors led by Liping Zhao, PhD, from the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers University-New Brunswick, New Jersey.


The research was conducted in China, and was published in the March 9 issue of Science.

However, separately, in an article published online November 1, 2017, in Gut, a whole-grain diet failed to alter insulin sensitivity and the gut microbiome in healthy individuals at risk for development of metabolic syndrome. But the high-fiber diet did lead to lower body weight and less systemic low-grade inflammation.
Certain Fibers Could Become Part of the Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes

In their paper, Zhao and colleagues explain that gut microbes play a range of roles in response to food intake, and they suggest that chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, may in part result from a deficiency in SCFA production from carbohydrate fermentation in the gut.

Broccoli helps control Diabetes 2 blood sugar levels



Diabetes patients may have a possible solution that helps control blood sugar levels. Health experts often advise people to eat their greens and eating broccoli could potentially hold the key to countering type 2 diabetes.